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This Island Nation – Weekly News Round-up

THIS ISLAND NATION
Weekly Maritime News Round-Up
News, Comment, Opinion
March 24, 2014

THIS WEEK – Pride in tall ships, world’s first LNG tug, Arklow Shipping and Cruise Liner new vessels… and more…..

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THIS ISLAND NATION RADIO PROGRAMME
The next edition of this hour-long programme will be broadcast on Wednesday, April 2 month from 7.30-8.30 p.m. on Youghal Radio cry104fm It will also be available on the station’s website live at www.cry104fm.com where it can also be downloaded as a podcast. The programme is available to all community radio stations in Ireland on request. Email: thisislandnation@gmail.com ************************************************

THIS ISLAND NATION SUPPLEMENT IN THE MARINE TIMES
The next edition of THIS ISLAND NATION supplement will be published in the April edition of THE MARINE TIMES, with a bright, new, editorial layout and containing news about all aspects of the marine sphere – shipping, fishing, leisure and the marine environment. Be sure to get your copy!
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NEWS ————————————–

TALL SHIPS PRIDE – See Photo
On next week’s THIS ISLAND NATION radio programme and in the April supplement in THE MARINE TIMES I will be talking to Captain Helge Risch, in command of the Gorch Fock. The pride of the German Navy in their tall ship was very evident in his when I spoke to him aboard:

“A square-rigger, a tall ship, is a great place to learn responsibility, to learn team work. That is why we have a tall ship to provide training for the German Navy.”

As I spoke to him aboard the beautiful barque which has been visiting Cobh, it made me even more conscious of the lack of a sail training vessel in Ireland, because of Government disregard. The Gorch Fock has 220 aboard between crew and trainees. Every one of its 23 sails and all the ropes to haul and set them are handled by hand. This is the concept of team work, everyone “pulling together” and being “in the same boat”. There are no winches or hydraulically-operated devices.

WORLD’S FIRST LNG TUG – See Photo
Sea trials have been successfully completed by the world’s first LNG tug, M/T Borgøy, designed by Norwegian Buksèr og Berging with the assistance of Marine Design AS in Norway. She was built by Sanmar’s shipyard in Istanbul. The engines, propulsion package and LNG system have been provided by Rolls Royce. Usage of LNG eliminates sulphur emissions and reduces the discharge of CO2 by 26 per cent. The vessel will be operated by Buksèr og Berging in Statoil’s Kaarstoe Gas Terminal.

NEW ARKLOW VESSELS – See Photos
Arklow Shipping have an ongoing new building programme to meet customer and market demand. Their latest vessels are a general cargoship and bulk-carrier completed from Dutch and South Korean shipyards which increase the company’s fleet to over 40 ships. Arklow Bank is a ‘B’ class general cargoship completed by Ferus Smit B.V. of Westerbroek in Holland. Others are understood to be in prospect. She is to join the company’s Dutch division, Arklow Shipping Nederland. The second vessel, Arklow Spray, is an ‘S’ class of 34,500 dwt tonnes.

OFFSHORE DOLPHINS – See Photo
The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group says that a new study confirms that bottlenose dolphins inhabiting offshore waters in Ireland are a separate population to those occurring inshore. It was carried out by French researcher Marie Louis, after analysis of 381 bottlenose dolphins either stranded or biopsy-sampled from Scotland to the south of Portugal, from the Azores and with biopsy samples provided by IWDG. There has been speculation about the existence of an offshore population for several years after it was discovered that the Shannon Estuary population is genetically distinct from bottlenose dolphins around the Irish coast.

BIGGEST EVER FOR HOLLAND AMERICA – See Photo
Holland America Line are introducing a new Pinnacle Class, the first of which will be the biggest ship ever for the company. Steel has been cut for the vessel which will be delivered from the Fincantieri shipyard in Marghera, Italy, in February of 2016. The 99,500 gross tonnage vessel will be the fifteenth ship to be built for Holland America Line by Fincantieri.

SEABOURN ALSO BUILD IN ITALY – See Photo
Seabourn Cruises has also signed contracts with Fincantieri for a new vessel, to be delivered in the second-half of 2016. It will be of 40,350 gt, 210 metres long and 28 metres wide, with a cruising speed of 18.6 knots and accommodation for 604 guests in 302 suites. Fuel consumption is to be reduced by optimising the ship’s hydrodynamics.

TUNA REACTION
A British survey has indicated that 78% of people who buy tinned tuna believe major supermarkets should stop selling tuna caught in a way that kills sharks, rays and turtles.

UNESCO WORRIES ABOUT WIPE OUT – See Photo
UNESCO is worried that rising global sea levels could wipe out some of the world’s most well-known and historically significant cultural landmarks, including the Statue of Liberty in New York City, the Tower of London in the United Kingdom and archaeological sites of Pompeii in Italy. However, this will not happen for quite a while, perhaps over the next 2,000 years, according to new research which examined long-term effects of sea-level rise on the 720 places around the world that have been designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites. It claims that 20 percent of them could be ruined if temperatures rise 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit (3 degrees Celsius) above pre-industrial levels over the next two millennia.

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